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China tariff cut offers little relief

- General News

It sounded like good news for U.S. fruit exporters when China announced it would cut tariffs …

FPAA Spring Policy Summit returns March 24

- General News
The event, cancelled last year due to the government shutdown, returns March 24 with a robust agenda to address the many challenges produce imports face at the border today

The Produce Reporter Week in Review – January 24, 2020

- General News
Greg and Pamela pay tribute to the lasting legacy of Frieda Caplan, and talk about what happened with Lucky's Market, Fairway Markets and the road ahead to reestablishing fresh produce trade in China. 

Hurdles remain on China trade deal

- Analysis
For fresh produce companies to benefit from Phase 1 of the U.S.-China trade deal agreed to last week, China’s commitment to purchase has to turn into certainty, analysts say.

The importance of USMCA to the produce industry

- General News
The U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that sits on President Trumps desk ready to be signed means more than just free trade to produce companies.

U.S.-China trade deal delivers some produce wins

- General News
The United States and China signed a trade agreement today that should improve access for U.S. fruit and vegetable exporters. Overall, China agreed to buy $200 billion worth of U.S. exports in the first two years of this first phase of the deal.

Citrus industry still faces trade winds

- Produce Blueprints

In trade, like many American industries, citrus growers and shippers have had to deal with the …

2020 Insights: International trade

- Produce Blueprints

Protectionism and trade conflicts are impacting the produce industry in several ways; with the landscape constantly …

FPAA: Threats about tomato virus twisted to influence politics

- General News
Authorities in the U.S., Mexico and Canada moved months ago to implement programs to limit the spread of a new tomato virus, ToBRFV, which is not a food safety threat to humans or animals.

Showing the weight of lobbying

- Analysis
While it’s important that Senators and U.S. representatives hear from their constituents in the produce industry, Congress usually reverts to its paralyzed, partisan ways, with little legislation to show for the industry’s efforts. But this year, that may change.