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GRADES & GOOD ARRIVAL

Eggplant are divided into U.S. Fancy, U.S. No. 1, and U.S. No. 2 grades: U.S. Fancy should exhibit similar varietal characteristics (except as a mixed or specialty pack; the same is true for U.S. No. 1), fruit should be well colored and shaped, firm, clean, and free from decay or worn holes and injury from scars, freezing, disease, insects, or mechanical means.

For U.S. No 1, eggplant should be fairly well colored and shaped, firm, clean, and free from the above decay and injuries; U.S. No. 2 should be firm, free from decay, and with no serious damage from freezing, disease, insects, or mechanical injury.

Generally speaking, the percentage of defects shown on a timely government inspection certificate should not exceed the percentage of allowable defects, provided: (1) transportation conditions were normal; (2) the USDA or CFIA inspection was timely; and (3) the entire lot was inspected.

U.S. Grade Standards Days Since Shipment % of Defects Allowed Optimum Transit Temp. (°F)
10-1 5
4
3
2
1
15-3
14-3
13-2
11-1
10-1
46-54°

There are no good arrival guidelines for this commodity specific to Canada; U.S. guidelines apply to shipments unless otherwise agreed by contract.

References: DRC, PACA, USDA.

INSPECTOR’S INSIGHTS

• There is no requirement for the color of the calyx; a calyx turning brown and dry is not a defect
• For U.S. No. 1, eggplant must be reasonably uniform in size: the weight of the smallest fruit is not less than half the weight of the largest
• Brown discoloration is scored as a defect when affecting more than 10% of the surface
• Shriveling is scored as a defect and serious damage when affecting more than 5% of the surface.

Source: Tom Yawman, International Produce Training, www.ipt.us.com.

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