Hype vs. reality

Thank goodness the Super Bowl is in the rear-view mirror.

The constant hype, parties with beautiful people in a warm climate (while we experienced the polar vortex), and being told how great the game and big party were going to be fizzled under the glare of reality: It was the lowest-scoring game in Super Bowl history; the halftime show was panned as being so-so; and the coup de grace—a TV commentator (Tony Romo) was said to be the real MVP of the game.

Something was amiss for sure.

Ask yourself how often you are drawn in to hype? It is the way of making everything appear to be bigger than it might turn out to be.

It is like buying a television—first we were told we needed an HD, then 4k came along, and now we are being told that 8k is the wave of the future.

Or how about buying a cell phone? Do I really need that new super-duper camera? Maybe we just need a phone with a few apps to make sure we arrive on time and find our way to where we are going.

The produce industry is no exception. We are always looking for the next big thing. What is the next apple that will set the industry on its ear? Is organic going to bring about more sales?

Anticipating the future in terms of what will be the next hot item is part of what makes business fun. I get it. It is fun to try and see around corners and vision down the road.

However, when all is said and done, a business needs to make a profit. Taking market share and pouring big bucks into research and development are necessary, balanced against the real-world response of what will, in fact, sell and make a profit.

In addition, not only is selling important, but collecting what you well is more important. Football coaches refer to the basics of the game as X’s and O’s, offense and defense. Produce is no exception.

Hype is important, but the basics matter more. After all, it is the team that has the most points on the scoreboard that matters, and that speaks to execution and performance.

Jim Carr is president and CEO of Blue Book Services Inc.